Many homeowners in Lexington rely on furnaces to heat their homes through the winter. To many, it’s the big metal box that sits in the garage or a utility closet – but the furnace is composed of many essential components which work together to create and distribute heat. Learn more about six of the components which make your furnace tick, and how they work together.

Essential Furnace Parts

  • Thermostat: The thermostat is situated away from the furnace, but is the brains behind the operation. When you adjust temperatures and settings on the thermostat inside, it relays the message to the furnace. The thermostat tells the furnace your home is too cold and needs more heat, or that the home is now at the correct temperature.
  • Burner: Once your thermostat calls for heat, the furnace’s burner initiates the combustion process, converting heating fuel (such as gas or oil) to energy. It looks like a glowing tube of blue light.
  • Heat Exchanger: The heat energy created by the burner moves to the heat exchanger, where it is used to warm air. The heat exchanger looks like a network of coiled pipe running back and forth – these coils heat up, and transfer heat to air as it passes over.
  • Flue: A flue, also called a vent pipe, expels byproducts of combustion from the heat exchanger to your home’s exterior. If combustion byproducts aren’t vented from your home, they would build up inside, putting your health and safety at risk.
  • Blower: The blower is essentially a heavy-duty fan, which moves warmed air from the heat exchanger through the ductwork. Typically, the blower is the furnace component which uses the most energy.
  • Ductwork: Your furnace is attached to a duct system, composed of sheet metal or flexible chambers. Warm air travels through the duct system into your home’s interiors. The duct system contains dampers, which open and close to control air distribution as well as keep air pressure balanced within the duct system.

If your furnace breaks down or isn’t producing heat properly, there could be an issue with one of these critical components, or other furnace parts. The NATE-certified furnace repair technicians of Climate Control are available to accurately diagnose and repair your furnace issues right away – call us today to schedule furnace repair!